Artworks under the lens

  • Art History • Artworks under the lens
    Yellow landscape (1965) – The Story of Roy Lichtenstein’s Coveted Piece

    Although the name Roy Lichtenstein conjures up images of comic print reproductions and heroines in distress, he also produced a series of landscape paintings using his signature primary colors and Ben Day dots. In his 1965 piece Yellow landscape, Lichtenstein utilizes these elements, using the plastic paper Rowlux to create a piece that displays his high art knowledge and his…

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    Venus of Urbino (1534): The Story Behind Titian’s Controversial Painting

    Titian’s 1534 artwork Venus of Urbino is thought to be a masterpiece of the high renaissance movement, depicting a young woman reclining on an opulent bed. It is also seen as one of history’s most controversial images, due to its frank depiction of female sexuality and Titian’s choice to display a nude in a domestic setting, rather than a mythical…

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    Green Violinist (1924): Marc Chagall’s Avant-Garde Style

    Marc Chagall’s Green Violinist is a striking composition that demonstrates his mastery of color and is simultaneously avant garde in its composition and traditional in its subject matter, a combination which characterized Chagall’s style. In this article, Singulart takes a closer look at the artist’s life and style and at the composition of Green Violinist.  Who was Marc Chagall?  Marc…

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    The Red Studio (1911): Henri Matisse’s Masterpiece

    Henri Matisse’s The Red Studio is a still life of the interior of his studio, including reproductions of his works on display. The Red Studio demonstrates the wide variety of influences that shaped Matisse’s unique personal style and is one of his most famous masterpieces. In this article, Singulart takes a closer look at The Red Studio and the influences…

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    Composition II With Red, Blue and Yellow (1930): Piet Mondrian

    Composition II with Red, Blue and Yellow is the epitome of the neo-plasticism movement, championed by abstract artist Piet Mondrian. Mondrian became infamous for his radically simplified artworks, which combined primary colors with strong vertical and horizontal lines. In this article, Singulart examines the trajectory of Mondrian’s artistic career, the creation of the De Stijl movement, and looks in detail…

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    The Potato Eaters (1885): Vincent Van Gogh’s Earliest Masterpiece

    The Potato Eaters is considered to be Vincent Van Gogh’s first significant artwork and his earliest masterpiece. It is the culmination of months of study by Van Gogh, observing working class families and their traditions, and creating hundreds of sketches until he settled on the scene depicted in The Potato Eaters. Van Gogh would later write, “I am plowing on…

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    Riding with Death (1988): One of Jean-Michel Basquiat’s Last Paintings

    Riding with Death is one of the last paintings Jean Michel Basquiat painted before his death in 1988. This fact, coupled with its disturbing imagery suggests it represents his opinion on the state of the world. In this article, Singulart takes a closer look at Basquiat’s life, career and the meaning behind Riding with Death.  Who was Jean Michel Basquiat?…

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    Triptych of the Temptation of St. Anthony (1501): Surreal world of Bosch

    Hieronymous Bosch’s Triptych of the Temptation of St. Anthony exemplifies his unique painting style that was characterized by rich symbolism and apocalyptic imagery depicting hell and unimaginable horrors. His grotesque, pessimistic, fantastic style had a far reaching influence on painters into the 20th century and greatly influenced the course of art history. In this article, Singulart takes a closer look…

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    The Large Bathers (1884-1887): Renoir’s Return to Classical Painting

    The Large Bathers is an example of Renoir’s experimentation combining a classic painting style with the newer style of the impressionists. Depicting three nude bathers frolicking at the water’s edge, the piece took Renoir three years to complete. In this article, Singulart explores the creative process behind The Large Bathers, as well as examines the symbolism of nude bathers to…

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    Bathers by a River (1909-1916): Henri Matisse’s Experiments with Cubism

    Henri Matisse’s Bathers by a River marks a moment of stylistic transition and demonstrates his exploration of Cubism. In this article, Singulart discusses Bathers by a River in the context of Matisse’s life and the development of his style.  Who was Henri Matisse?  Henri Matisse (1869-1954) was a French artist, renowned as a draftsman, printmaker, sculptor and painter. Matisse was…