Movements and techniques

  • Art History • Movements and techniques
    Acrylic Painting

    Acrylic painting is a relatively young medium, as it emerged in the mid-20th century. It was first made commercially available in the 1960s, and while it does not have the same long history as watercolour or oil painting, it was instantly incredibly popular. Its versatility means that it was presented as an alternative to traditional oil painting, and it opened…

  • Art History • Movements and techniques
    Contemporary Art

    Contemporary art resists easy definition, due to the incredible variety of art it encompasses. It is broadly defined as the art of today, created during the late 20th and early 21st century. It is characterised by its global nature, the diversity of cultures it explores, and the influence of technology and the digital age. Contemporary art involves experimental and dynamic…

  • Art History • Movements and techniques
    Landscape Painting: A Brief History

    Landscape painting is a highly popular artistic genre present in many cultures and artistic traditions with a long and established history. Landscape painting encompasses a variety of natural scenes including mountains, rivers, valleys, forests, fields, and coasts. This definition was expanded in the 20th century to include urban and industrial landscapes. Landscape painters are inspired by the world around them…

  • Art History • Movements and techniques
    History of Pop Art: A Short Summary of the Movement and its Most Important Artists

    Pop Art is a movement that emerged in 1950s Britain and exploded into enormous and everlasting success in 1960s America. Pop art employed a new, bold aesthetic inspired by popular culture such as advertising, comic books, and was a celebration of the mundane and the kitsch. The movement, as a reflection of the times, was about multiples and mass reproduction,…

  • Art History • Movements and techniques
    Portrait Painting and Capturing the Essence of Your Subject

    Portraiture and portrait painting focuses on depicting a human subject. Historically, portraits have often been commissioned and portray either public or private figures, which gives them importance as historical records; they recorded the past before the advent of photography. They are generally inspired by admiration for the subject, who is often the muse of the artist. While early portraits were…

  • Art History • Movements and techniques
    Street Art

    Street art is visual art that is created in public locations, outside of traditional art venues. It is connected to graffiti art in that it is generally unsanctioned and in public spaces, but it includes a wide variety of media and is connected more closely to graphic design. The key differences between graffiti and street art are partly historic. Graffiti…

  • Art History • Movements and techniques
    Watercolour Painting: Capturing the imagination

    Watercolour paint consists of pigments suspended in water, which gives the paint a translucent effect. Watercolour artists often paint on paper, exploring the transparency of the paint and leaving sections unpainted to highlight certain areas of the paper. It is celebrated for its natural, luminous qualities and has been favoured by renowned artists such as Turner and Blake. Last day,…

  • Art History • Movements and techniques
    Vanitas Painting, Death, and Decadence

    As a subgroup of still life, Vanitas painting is a category of art that aims to show the temporary nature of life, the futility of pleasure, and the inevitability of death. Vanitas painting often feature symbols of wealth, death and ephemerality. There are two main categories of Vanitas painting: those which symbolize death with objects such as skulls, candles and withered flowers and…

  • Art History • Movements and techniques
    Famous Portrait Paintings from Early Modern History

    Portrait painting has been a central genre and artistic pursuit for centuries. Historically speaking, commissioned portraits were status symbols used to convey the wealth and prominence of their subject. A portrait could be used to intimidate as in the case of certain royal portraits, to pay homage to the gods, or to link certain people to the wealth, success, fertility…