Movements and techniques

  • Art History • Movements and techniques
    Street Art

    Street art is visual art that is created in public locations, outside of traditional art venues. It is connected to graffiti art in that it is generally unsanctioned and in public spaces, but it includes a wide variety of media and is connected more closely to graphic design. The key differences between graffiti and street art are partly historic. Graffiti…

  • Art History • Movements and techniques
    Watercolour Painting: Capturing the imagination

    Watercolour paint consists of pigments suspended in water, which gives the paint a translucent effect. Watercolour artists often paint on paper, exploring the transparency of the paint and leaving sections unpainted to highlight certain areas of the paper. It is celebrated for its natural, luminous qualities and has been favoured by renowned artists such as Turner and Blake. Last day,…

  • Art History • Movements and techniques
    Vanitas Painting, Death, and Decadence

    As a subgroup of still life, Vanitas painting is a category of art that aims to show the temporary nature of life, the futility of pleasure, and the inevitability of death. Vanitas painting often feature symbols of wealth, death and ephemerality. There are two main categories of Vanitas painting: those which symbolize death with objects such as skulls, candles and withered flowers and…

  • Art History • Movements and techniques
    Famous Portrait Paintings from Early Modern History

    Portrait painting has been a central genre and artistic pursuit for centuries. Historically speaking, commissioned portraits were status symbols used to convey the wealth and prominence of their subject. A portrait could be used to intimidate as in the case of certain royal portraits, to pay homage to the gods, or to link certain people to the wealth, success, fertility…

  • Art History • Movements and techniques
    Lithography: the Variety and Democracy of a medium

    Lithography is one of the greatest artistic developments of the 19th century. Literally translated as “writing on stone”, lithography is a technique that involves etching a drawing in oil or fat, and using the immiscibility (inability to be mixed) of ink and water to make an imprint, usually on paper. It enabled artists and illustrators to duplicate drawings and texts…

  • Art History • Movements and techniques
    Marine in art

    As Marinus = at sea, motives such as ships, sea, ocean and port are popular and frequently used themes in Navy arts. Early up the sixteenth century both professional artists and laymen took up the theme of the navy and brought it to the canvases. Various artists were instantly attracted by the power and beauty of the water, recreating both…

  • Art History • Movements and techniques
    How art came to the canvas

    Art captures periods of time. In our 21st digitized century, creativity is still present in the foundation of art and completely exploits the unlimited possibilities. With the application of Pixel Art, the new computer art is a high contender, a graphic artist edit your works on the PC, Photoshop has become the tool of choice for most photographers, colours can…

  • Art History • Movements and techniques
    The 5 most romantic scenes in Impressionist paintings

    Painting real life in “plein air”, captivating the impression of the moment, collecting light effects and neglecting the linear perspective are the words that spring to mind when talking about Impressionism.We are taking a journey through the most romantic scenes from Impressionist paintings and would like to present you a selection that is a little different from the most popular…

  • Art History • Artworks under the lens • Movements and techniques
    The Cubism Movement and the Paintings That Defined the Genre

    The Cubism movement emerged during the early-20th-century avant-garde art movement that revolutionized European painting and sculpture. The movement is thought to have begun in Paris (specifically in the neighborhoods of Montmartre, Montparnasse, and Puteaux which were populated by artists) during the 1910s and 1920s. Cubism was chiefly pioneered by artists Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque. Other important artists of the…